Greg's Blog

trying to find out what's up?

 

 

Official website
Follow me on LinkedIn follow me on facebook tweet me
get in touch

Art with Benefits

March 11, 2015 by admin
mom_n_pops

Mom & Pops

The first painting I did after trading the bottle for the brush was one for my Mother. In the previous 20 years I had completed maybe 1 painting, and I was totally excited about methodically stretching my canvas, and putting my paints in position around the pallet. There is something about this process that helps clear and focus the mind for me.

My Mom had the misfortune of being born on January 1st. Sure it sounds good, but for those of you who have been born on a holiday know that forever you are sharing your day with something else, and rarely get 100% of what you deserve. Mix in the Christmas holiday, and you are really losing out, let alone being a Mom who always puts everyone else and their needs before her own. So I wanted to do something special for her and a painting of the farmstead where she grew up was what some of my ever so helpful siblings helped me come up with.

Mommo funeral scan 2 032

The Farmstead

The farm had been auctioned off after my Grandmothers death, and many things had changed, the barn torn down, windmill removed, trees replaced, so I set about gathering old photos from my sisters and my Aunts. What I ended up with was a time capsule of photos in all shapes and varieties and here is where the real work begins.

There’s a lot of research involved in doing things such as this, and planning. Much more than what I was used to, but what I ended up with was a painting of what it could have looked like to her as a child. I didn’t know really, grabbing a black & white photo from one angle, and then heavily faded photos from different views you take what you can and hope for the best.

We celebrated my Mom’s birthday on the same day as we celebrated the family Christmas, a day predetermined months in advance when everyone could arrive on the same date from out of town. But after things had settled from the gift exchanges and after the big Christmas dinner we all gathered around in the dining room and had cake and ice cream with my Mom.

I managed to get my gift moved towards the back of the little pile of things for my Mom, most knew what it was, and were in on it in some way or another, but it was finally given to her to open. It was a 16×20″ painting with a good sized frame so it was a bit hard for my Mom to handle. She had suffered a severe stroke in the early 70’s and had almost no use of her left arm, but like she managed to run a household and raise 6 children with my Father gone on the road most of the time, opening a present was child’s play.

This was in the winter of 2002, and I was born in 1957, so in my 45 years I don’t remember my Mom ever breaking down in tears. Through all the pain and trouble that she had gone through in her life, 6 very dysfunctional children, (okay 5, Kathy might be normal) and having to deal with her own and Dads alcoholism that would have I thought brought most people to their knees,  and maybe it did, but I don’t remember her ever crying.

B0004852

Christmas

But when she ripped away the gift wrap, and saw what was in there she broke down and wept. I could not believe it, this was totally surprising and unexpected. I don’t know what kind of response I had expected, but I nothing like this, and I was so embarrassed, and yet so pleased.

I think she liked it!

I had always loved to paint, and out of college I had begun to enter competitions nationally and internationally and was winning awards, but this was different. To have something I did move my Mom so much. It was unimaginable, and so rewarding.

How many careers are there in this world where what you do stirs up such emotion? Plumber? Dentist? The tears these people cause are from pain or when they hand you the bill! But I’m talking tears of joy.

Actually I guess there are really quite a few professions than can do this, writers, musicians, clergy… politicians?

But I didn’t know that I could do this with my art.

It is not an everyday occurrence for me, and I don’t know if my heart could take it, but I do love to put something into my work, a feel of where I was, or what I saw, maybe what I felt. Rarely does it come across, but when it does there is a overwhelming sense of satisfaction for me.

But the creating of something specifically for another, whether a gift, an act of kindness, or a commissioned work and it reaches into that person and stirs emotions and feelings that only they could know.

That is a reward to me like no other.

Being an artist is great, taking a beautifully empty piece of canvas and turning it into something visually appealing is amazing. But then taking that same talent, and using it to help and benefit others is amazing. Whether teaching, or sharing, just taking the time for another when they need it.

And one of my most favorite quotes is of course from a song, “Wond’ring Aloud” by Jethro Tull, written by Ian Anderson

“.,. it is only in giving that makes you what you are”

A Harrington Hike SOLD

A Harrington Hike

 

 

Need a Push

February 5, 2015 by admin

It’s been a while since I’ve written here, but it’s not because I’m not thinking about it. When I began writing that first blog I knew there was no way I could do this daily, even trying to commit to weekly was pushing my limits.New Orleans Day 5 123

This is more about pushing yourself out of that little comfortable place you’ve found, going past what you know you can do and try to improve.

As many know I paint landscapes, big giant chunks of earth that just sits there holding still waiting for you to paint it.  I’m not perfect at it, but I’m practicing. Well I had an opportunity come along that took my comfortable little niche of landscape painting and pushed it to the other extreme… to paint the battles at the 2015 Bicentennial of the War of 1812, more specifically the Battle of New Orleans which ended up being the deciding battle in the war and we have enjoyed peace with Great Britain ever since.

New Orleans Day 7 081My sister and brother-in-law (Kathy & Ron) has a place on Burgundy in the French Quarter and had sent me contact info to some of the organizers of this event. After months of back and forth as these things sometimes go, I was working with the Louisiana Living History Society who were the instigators in much of the reenactments happening to celebrate 200 years.

I was going to be allowed on the battlefield amidst almost 1,500 reenactors as they recreated the infamous battles.

I don’t think I ever really thought it out, but while packing my gear and ensuring I had clothing that would pass as “period” attire, it came to me what I was about to do.

What in the world was I thinking?

I do pride myself in being somewhat adept at painting quickly. I usually spend no longer than 2 hours on a piece out on location, with the initial block-in done in the first 30 minutes. The clouds move across the sky, the water cascades across the rocks, and the sun is forever changing the light all around us, and I’ve grown used to this occurring while I paint.

…but troops running in formation across a battle field, guns blazing, cannons roaring. What was I getting into? I had no idea, and I was a bit frightened to tell the truth.

Excited, yet scared of the unknown that was about to come down.New Orleans Day 5 112

There was not a lot of preparation for me ahead of time. I had to be in position 30 minutes before the start of the battle, and once in place I had no real idea where on the battle field the fighting was going to take place. I’m not sure how large of an area was that was cleared out for the reenactment, but there had to have been at least 10 acres in front of me and the action could be anywhere, so little was done to prep the canvases ahead of time save toning them, and then putting in a horizon line.

Conveniently there was a PA system that had a master of ceremonies announcing and narrating some of the battles, but the speakers were facing the audience, and once the gunfire began I heard nothing again till the battles had concluded. So with this I was made aware that things were about to begin.

My knees were shaking now!

But once I began looking, composing and throwing down a little paint, things began to recede around me. I was focused in what I needed to do. I still was not sure how, but it is really just notes of color next to each other and how they compare to those around it. It doesn’t matter the subject, or how long they are there. Put it down as you see it, or as you feel it.

“Luke, use the Force”

Do I think of it as notes of color when I’m out there? No, I don’t think so, in fact these battles took place and were totally over in from 39 minutes to 50 minutes. There was no real time to think, only to act or maybe “react” would be a better word. And while this was going on, I would occasionally grab my camera and take photos for reference material for other paintings done from these studies.

New Orleans Day 5 087Different battles had different things going on of course, the night battle there were the Choctaw Indians scurrying through the woods around me, another battle had friendly fire going over my head as troops were falling all around. I was told I should have earplugs on because of all the explosions and gunfire, but it all fell away as one enters that “zone” to create.

I deemed it a success, I created a total of 12 paintings on the trip, 1 of each of the 4 battles, and then other supporting studies from around the campsite and original Chalmette Battlefield.

I am a far cry from an expert in the field of plein air painting, but there are some things that one grows comfortable at. I guess it’s essential in order for us to grow as an artist to push oneself. I don’t feel the need for me to become an expert at portraits, or painting still life’s. I think one can grow without the necessity to learn every medium there is.

There is so much work to be done here learning oil painting the land, it would take several lifetimes to even come close.

I would be be remiss if I did not mention the article that Bob Bahr from Outdoor Painter Magazine wrote on my little adventure. It’s a short little article that won’t take much time at all, and has a few nice photos, plus Bob is a much better writer than me.

Check it out here: CLICK

I’d better get going, I’m wasting precious time, and so are you 😉

Dec 28, 1814 Battle of New Orleans - SOLD

Dec 23, 1814 Battle of New Orleans

 

thanks

Greg

 

The Old Same Thing

October 15, 2014 by admin

You know, the “Old Same Thing”!

Do you have a limit for doing the same old thing, don’t you get tired of it? How long can you keep repeating the same old routine before it becomes just that?

I’ve done it before, and still do at times. I could eat PB&J’s for lunch on a daily basis forever. I love them! Or maybe it’s going to work

everyday going to the corner taking a left, then a right at the stop sign, go to the light, take a right enter the freeway and off to the office. Over, and over, and over again. How many days a week? The only time you vary it is when you hear of an accident along the route during the 8:09 traffic report. Hey-hey, there’s variety!

When it comes to me and the world of art, do things get repetitive for me? Maybe, yes, how about you? I see some people paint the same scene over and over, same size, same time of day, same conditions. They do it as learning experiences, and I know I could benefit greatly from doing something like this, but I don’t see it happening.

I am a co-founder and director of the Brush Creek Art Walk: plein air competition, and each year we ask artists to paint along a creek that cuts through the upscale urban shopping district of the Country Club Plaza, and meanders past my favorite place in Kansas City, the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art. Don’t stop here, there is more painting to be done farther East as you  cut BCAW day 1 065through the older  neighborhoods where you could say, okay I will say, “urban blight?” Yet you’re not done yet, there’s maybe another mile and a half of sprawling park like areas with rolling hills, woods, and a lake. There really is a lot to see down this way, the entire way! I think it’s pretty darn diverse, with interesting subjects that could last a lifetime.

But that’s just me.

What I hear and what I see a lot is people talking of how repetitive things are, they come back year after year painting the same old thing, and I can really feel for them. I don’t enjoy people being unhappy with a situation. I try to be accommodating, but there is a reason that the city approached Anne Garney and me about finding a way to get people down to along the creek. The city over the past 10-15 years has spent millions, upon millions of dollars improving the area, solving the flooding problem of the local businesses and residences, and at the same time beautifying the entire area…

…but nobody knows.

It has a not so endearing nickname, “Flush Creek!” Not a real pretty picture that title paints. It’s not so bad if the rains come, but on long dry spells no water moves, and flotsam gathers here and there, and there.

The thing about a good artist, they can paint what they want, not what is there. Sit me down in the same spot 10 times in a row and I doubt I paint the same scene more than once.  Would I paint the debris, and urban blight? Sure if the light hit it right!

I notice that many people paint the exact same thing, without even thinking about it. We are attracted to the obvious, and many tend to paint this. You see a big red truck in front of you; most will paint the big red truck. Mix it up by painting the way the big red trucks shadow stretches off across the ground, or the cool patterns that the tail lights make when you zoom in really close.

It’s not really what you see, it’s how you see it, and then maybe more importantly, how you put it to canvas. I do love seeing how a few

Adam & Andrea

Adam & Andrea

dozen artists paint the exact same object; it is amazing and quite the learning experience to me the viewer.  But artists and buyers alike do get bored with this over time.

There is so much to see in this little area, one could spend a lifetime doing just that. Look at the great Wilbur Niewald, he has been going to Loose Park and painting there for decades. You have the constantly changing light and seasons, this is what makes this world as wonderful and interesting as it is, and affects everything we see outdoors.

A good artist should be able to make or create interest when there is none. Don’t just look for what is already beautiful, find what could be beautiful and make it so. You are the creator, take control.

What is one of the best ways of learning something? REPETITION! Are you so good that this doesn’t apply? Let me shake your hand, as I scrape that last painting and start all over.

It’s a mind set, look for something new, a new approach, don’t get trapped into doing the same old thing the same old way, improve, enhance, and embrace the opportunity…

…over and over again!

And time for the show

And time for the show

 

What’s it going to take?

September 8, 2014 by admin

Do you have something that is so near and dear to you that no matter what the circumstances you are not going to get rid of it?

I do, but it is definitely NOT my minivan. So why keep fixing it?

IMAG0382What I sometimes refer to as my “Paint-Mobile” is a 2003 Ford Windstar Minivan. The perfect vehicle for any soccer Mom across the country, and I find it the perfect vehicle to travel the country loaded with paint gear and living supplies.

I’ve been kind of negligent on my posting my blogs as of late, and I’m going to blame it in part to my Paint Mobile. As those who have been following me  probably know I’ve been on the road lately. And what’s more dangerous than texting and driving? Yes! you guessed it, typing out your weekly blog while driving. Being the safety conscious guy I am, I “curbed” my desire to “blog & drive”.

I’ve been painting in the Ozark mountains these past few weeks, working on a project with 3 other artists for Big Cedar Lodge, painting plein air pieces on some of their properties. This day I’m speaking in particular of, I was painting in Dogwood Canyon, had just finished up a painting of the Long Pine Bridge and was getting ready to head back home for a time.

Long Pine Fishing

Long Pine Fishing

If you don’t know the Ozark Mountains well, there are some wonderful windy roads through hills and valleys. Perfect for cruising on your motorcycle… but I was in the minivan. I pulled out of the canyon and less than a mile away I was rounding a narrow curve heading uphill when all of a sudden my trusty steed decided not to go forward any longer.

There was no curb to speak of, but I did manage to roll my vehicle backwards so that at least the right side tires were off the road. This was not good. The engine was working fine, because it had to… I had just replaced it two years ago, what could this be? I put it in “Drive”… nothing! “Reverse”… nothing still! I was getting a sick feeling that it might be the transmission. NOOO! Oh well,  I mean I have only 185,000 miles on the car…

…so far.

My phone was getting sporadic cell service in the  canyon areas, and I had my fingers crossed as I dialed my “Emergency Roadside Assistance” number. Hooray, I somehow managed to have my car fizzle out in an area where the phone worked.

It took about 2 hours waiting on the side of the road being the obstacle in the road that cars from both directions had to slow down for, but the tow truck finally arrived, and took me to nice service place in a town that I totally forgot where it was when I tried to get back to it, but that’s another story. Jeannie, Rhonda, EVERYONE at Big Cedar Lodge was a big help in getting me and my van going again.

I’m stopping there because I think I’ve gone a bit “off topic”. But you get the idea, my van crapped out… AGAIN!

Paint Mobile

Paint Mobile

My engine died 2 years ago on my, replaced my front end last year, and just now my transmission.

Susie had a pretty good question for me…

“What’s it going to take to make you replace this old thing?” I told her, “when the radio goes out!”

But that’s not true. There is the same CD that’s been stuck in there for over a year and I can’t get it out. My tape player won’t play tapes, but I put this converter in it, and plug my Ipod into it so I have my tunes. I need my tunes for driving.

I have no special bonds with my “paint mobile”. I don’t have a name for it like my sisters. They seem to name all of their vehicles, me I name my children, and title my paintings, and try not to get them confused.

It’s probably just convenient to keep the same car. I don’t have payments on it any longer, though repairs are really adding up. I was hoping to get ahead of the game, maybe going 5 years or so without the cumbersome burden of car payments. So I’ve got to start the timer over with this newest investment in my paint-mobile.

What’s it going to take? Realistically? Probably when I my sales of 5 digit paintings become a bit more prevalent. I believe I might be better situated to replace my “green machine”… and those old tennis shoes that are worn in just right, and my red t-shirt I always use to…

Road Trip

Road Trip

4995.6 miles

July 23, 2014 by admin

Does it seem like a lot to you? Before I left I could not really wrap my fuzzy little brain around what I was about to do.

Maybe you are the type of artist that travels extensively across the country in search of your holy grail. There are a good number of you out there, but the majority of artists travel less than 25 yards to their studio. Count the steps next time you go, is it upstairs, or in the basement? Maybe your studio is not in your home, rather you are one of a minority that needs to hop in their car and travel a few miles or across town to where your studio lies.

Even still a smaller number of artists call the great outdoors their studio, though for tax purposes my accountant will not do the square footage on this. I am pleased to be one of these outdoor landscape painters. Taking my art from the inside out, putting a life into it and into myself that the studio just wasn’t doing. Many of you have found this same thing, and have taken up the call of the “plein air” artist. Buen Trabajo!

I just returned from a painting trip that involved my traveling to the Adirondacks of upstate New York for Eric Rhodes “Publisher’s Invitational”. Immediately following this I took part in the “Plein Air Richmond” in Richmond Virginia which I was juried into, and the last 2 weeks was spent as Excursion Guide and Participating Artist at the “Crested Butte Plein Air Invitational” in Colorado. (somewhere in the middle of that I hung a solo show of my Southern Colorado paintings in Evergreen.

It is not something I do regularly, though I am finding out that there are many who do on a day in, day out basis. I am envious of those artists, and at the same time I feel for them.

It is not easy for one thing, the best light for painting is early and late, and every minute in between is filled with trying to capture this illusive thing. Little sleep, always on your feet in whatever conditions Mother Nature decides on for that moment. Coating every exposed piece of skin first with sunscreen, and then with insect repellent. Doing this day in, and day out in strange beds, strange dinners, it takes it’s toll.

But I loved every minute of it!

I could or should just be content to paint here in my own back yard. It shouldn’t matter where you are, whether in the plains of the Midwest like me, the coastal lands on either end, or the mountains somewhere in between. There are a lifetime of things to paint right where we lay. It’s not necessary to go in search of that beauty elsewhere, in fact the chances of you selling where you are increases if you use paintings of where you are. It’s much harder to sell the Philadelphia skyline in Denver than one might think.

So why do it?

Well like everything else, I’m either going to blame it on my sisters, or my parents. This time Mom & Dad, maybe Dad in particular. See R. E. Summers was a cowboy from the word go. Born in the Flint Hills of Kansas, he worked the Konza Prairie back when it was called the “A Ranch”, and he continued to play cowhand in Gunnison Colorado till he had too many kids that he had to get serious about life and raising a family. What does a cowboy do when he needs money? I have no idea, but Dad hit the road as a truck driver.

I was not a fan of my Dad being on the road so much, and as I travel to different art events across the country I was reminded of this. Was he following his dream as I am? I hope so.

What are we trying to accomplish in all this, is it to be a better artist? That is not a dream, but one of my goals, to become the best artist that I can be. Will it be the best out there? I doubt it, there is always one better, one faster, one stronger. Maybe 100, or 1,000’s better, faster, cooler, it doesn’t matter. My Mom was always chiding me about this, why I’m helping and teaching others to do something that might one day push me out to pasture. I never got her to understand the “helping others is a good way to help yourself”. Mom being from never having wealth was always hoping that I would have, and was concerned with my prosperity.

” Artists should not be paid for their art.  Getting paid corrupts the creative process.” Who in the world said this? Whoever it was probably did not have a family to support or paints to buy. We could and should get into a whole new line of discussion on this one, but focus for a second.

I travel across the country taking part in exhibits and competitions because I believe it is the fastest way to where I want to be. Paul Dorrell who wrote a fine book “Living the Artists Life” mentioned in it that you don’t have to be able to make it in New York City before you make it in your home town. (those of you whose home town is New York have a little quandary going there). Maybe Paul is right, I’m sure he is, but I think to do so you must have a gimic in your art, or be a really quirky artist, or just be darned good at what you do, and since I fall short in most of these areas… I need help, plus I’m trying to make it as an impressionistic landscape artist like everyone else, so we’ve got to work harder and we’ve got to work everywhere else before we are even noticed in “Home town USA”

That’s my take on it, so far.

I began writing a “travel log” on my trip when I left for New York, and did well untill I ran into a snag with the lack of internet connection in Richmond. Not that they didn’t have it, they didn’t know the password so I could log in… so I didn’t and I focused on painting instead.

The Publishers Invitational in New York was just what the doctor ordered. It was relaxing, everyone was friendly and outgoing. Sharing thoughts, ideas, and insights with no giant egos to deal with. Professional and amatuer status was thrown away, it was all “artists making art”

Then it was on to Plein Air Richmond in Virginia for a week. Not as relaxing at all, dawn to dusk painting with a bustling city in the early days of summer. It was crazy, congested, fun and frenzied. Painting in a week long competition with the final show on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Then without a moments rest I had gone from sea level in the East to almost 10,000 feet to the Crested Butte Plein Air Invitational. Here I had been invited to be an excursion leader for the artists and a participating artist in the Grand Exhibit.

I want to bring this to a close soon. It was long days for the entire month, if I wasn’t hiking the mountains with my gear, it was dodging traffic with the same stuff on my back, searching for the car that you know you parked… hmmm, I know I parked it near here. Darn, lost again! Then when I wasn’t on my feet hiking or painting then I was driving to the next location. There were many days where that’s all it was from morning to night, driving… with my windows down and my tunes carrying in the wind.

Let me equate the artistic journey to something like… like…

Baseball!

It’s something that one has to work at very hard, though it’s a job that many look at as “Just for Fun”. Maybe it is fun, but to be successful at it, you have to go to the next level, and that’s getting out of the recreational league and hitting the pros.

Are you going to be satisfied playing for the local club, or do you think you are ready for Triple A ball? Get out there and go for it, then once your successful at this, then jump in with the big dogs in the Majors. Did you get embarrassed at the plate and sent back to Boise with your gear falling out behind you, or did you take a swing and get on base?

For me and my goals I’ve got to play the majors. There are  not too many things that feel as satisfying as taking a full swing and hearing that CRACK as bat meets ball and you see it fly. It doesn’t have to be out of the park, a line drive down the 3rd base line is still rewarding. It’s knowing that you can hit the fast ball and the curve when they come your way.

Put me in Coach, I’m ready to play today

Weathering the Storm

Weathering the Storm

 

License and Registration Please: 7

June 22, 2014 by admin

After today, there’s tomorrow.

But I won’t be painting tomorrow, at least not in the Adirondacks. I’m going to keep this short (yay, I know) because I must be leaving Road Trip NY Day 7 007about 4am to get to Richmond VA in time for registration.

On the agenda for today was painting at Tupper Lake, Bog River Falls, and then a closing party at our hosts summer home just around the corner.

With painting gear, plenty of gas and a feeling this is going to be the best day of painting ever because this is it, I’m out of here after today I set out on the 35 minute drive to Bog River Falls. There are good things and bad things about jumping out on your own to get to a painting location instead of caravaning over with the group. The good thing is you don’t have to wait for everyone to get ready to go, you can go at your own driving speed, and you get to the best painting spots for yourself. The bad thing is you don’t know where all the best painting spots are. Road Trip NY Day 7 016I did get a pretty good painting place here, but I wanted to get out on a little (okay it probably weighed 10 tons) boulder in the river, and I had brought my hip-waders to do just that, cut across the river without getting wet, but the water was up and rushing through at such a rate I know if I had tried I’d have been swept away with the current… so I stayed put.

Next on to Tupper Lake, just a few miles around the bend.  I ended up setting up along the highway in what IRoad Trip NY Day 7 036 thought was a pretty wide shoulder. The view was across the lake at a couple little islands popping up out of the lake that are pretty typical of this area. The sun was coming in and and, then out and in. It did not really know what it was going to do, so I worked with it.

If I something catches my eye along the highway, or roadside, I tend to pullover and paint. Not always the safest thing, and if it looks like I’m going to be a hazard, or that it really does look dangerous, I’ll not do it. But I’ve a few wonderful Facebook friends that were concerned and have sent me little warning triangles you set on the road, and a bright yellow reflective  vest. Now I can be seen by orbiting satellites I believe.

I set up and painted, and while doing so I had some motorcyclists stop and take pictures, and a family stop and visit. Next a State Trooper drove by, saw me and made a U-turn with his flashing lights on and pulled in behind me. (now flashing lights would be a good way to get people to slow down and avoid me, hmmm?)

The officer was a nice guy, and really enjoyed the painting, but he said that parking my car straight across from where I was painting was creating a possible bottleneck and wanted to know if I could move the car a little. I guess I wasn’t thinking when I saw what I Road Trip NY Day 7 070wanted to paint, pulled the car way way over, grabbed my gear and crossed the street.

The officer did have some nice things to say about the painting, and asked for my card, I told him that this was the first time a policeman had asked for my card instead of my “License and Registration” please.

The party at Eric’s house was splendid. A home to simply die for, I’ll post some pics of it on my FB page, so check that out. Everyone was cleaned up and ready for a little meeting and greeting fun.

Always a sad thing when something like this comes to a close. You remember going off toe camp and meeting some great people, you build a friendship, now with not just the art in common, but a week painting with each other at “Paint Camp” what a blast!

I don’t think the final count has been done, but I believe there were about 900 paintings in the “Great Room”  from all of the artists. Simply incredible, all made by wonderful people of wonderful places.

 

That One Place, 6

June 21, 2014 by admin

If there were one place you would like to go paint, where would that place be? I would have to think long and hard on that one, but for the artists from the “Hudson River Valley” one of the most widely painted locations was “The Flume” on the Ausable River.

No where close to the biggest or best waterfall in country, let alone the state, but it’s drop through the gorge is pretty spectacular.  Road Trip Day 6 026This was to be our second destination for the day, we started off going to “Heavens Hill” Farm in Lake Placid. An amazing beautiful farmstead with meadows, classic outbuildings and me what do I do? (No I did not paint the outhouse this time) I painted what looked like a little cabin nestled in the woods behind it. The light was hitting a little open field before it with a road winding up between the trees. It was made for me and my pallet.

There must have been  at least 50 artists painting the farm, with maybe 4 or 5 painting the cabin.

As soon as I finished I didn’t wait around for everyone else, I jumped into my paint-mobile and headed towards “The Flume”. I had programed the Longitude and Latitude  coordinates into my GPS the night before so I knew I would be fine finding the place.

I had no idea what the area was like, but if it were anything like “High Falls” on Tuesday the prime painting locations might quickly fill up, and I wanted me in one of those locations.

I didn’t need to worry, it’s a pretty long stretch of waterfalls, with good locations on both sides of the river. I hooked up with a couple other artists that were just getting there when I arrived and hiked the trails with them looking for a place to paint. Eric mentioned this to me that when heading out painting, should not go into hazardous territory alone. You never know what might happen, slip and fall, if you are alone you are out of luck. And seriously, my AT&T signal does not work in many places up here.

"Painting the Ausable River"

“Painting the Ausable River”

Found a place to paint that had a good view of the river, not the falls, but still a pretty scene with some nice granite walls around. The three of us were set up on a not so big granite boulder, so there was not a lot of backing up and looking at the paintings. Also the sun hitting the foaming water created a bright white glare that made it hard to see the painting well. After I had blocked in the piece I turned it a different direction and turned around to look at the scene when I thought I needed to.

As we painted we saw the influx of artists meandering in from the “Heavens Hill Farm” beginning to set up in strategic locations on both sides of the river.

Whew! Just in time.

When finished it was about 4:30 which gave us an hour to get back in time for supper. I packed up and began a hike up river along a trail. Here I passed up many a artist painting in various stages of completeness. As I climbed up river with my gear I came upon a giant granite slab high above the river with a perfect view of the gorge below Highway Road Trip Day 6 04686 bridge… and not a soul set up here painting. I thought it a great view, and I checked out my watch, 5:00. I know if I started a painting if I was quick enough I could get back in time before the chow hall closed at 7:30.

Well I did not travel half way across the continent to eat, let’s roll!

I whipped out my gear and was set up in what had to be record time for me. A smaller 14×11″ canvas for me this time. Things went pretty well, quickly blocking in, now lets get those values right!

I finished up about 6:15, packed up and hiked my way back to my car. 6:50 now. There was no way I could make it back in time for supper, I pretty much stopped at the 1st place I could find, delicious!

I know there is a lesson somewhere here to be learned but for the life of me I’m at a loss as to what it was.Road Trip Day 6 038

The rest of the night went quickly, I dropped off my 3 finished paintings in the “Great Room” which was getting very full of paintings. Then headed out to enjoy some S’Mores by a bon fire they were setting up.

Another good day with one more painting day in the Adirondacks left. Hope to make it the best.

We shall see.

Road Trip Day 6 059

Finding the Vista (day 5)

June 20, 2014 by admin
Portable shade

Portable shade

The Publishers Invitational is an artists “paint camp”, you just come and paint when ever, and whatever you want in what I’m finding is a very wonderful part of America. But Eric in the grand scheme of things knowing there are many who are not familiar with the area might need some ideas on where to go for some popular painting locations. Granted you could turn in almost every direction and find something to paint, but some have traveled thousands of miles and paid good money to take part.

Provided is a great newspaper size hand out. (newspaper size, but on quality paper mind you) with all sorts of locations to paint, plus organized groups of to go out to locations to paint. Myself being a newbie have been taking part in as many as possible… you know, “when in Rome…”

Today the morning locations was a high plains view of farm and valley with the backdrop of the Adirondacks. A bright sunny day, with the winds blowing just enough to keep the flying insect critters away.

I set up a handy canopy to shelter me from the sun. It’s a 8×12′ shelter made for tailgating, fits perfectly into a parking space. Easy to set up, and comes in a handy carrying case with wheels. ( would not take it too far from my car)

"To Norman Ridge we Go"

“To Norman Ridge we Go”

My focal point was a quaint barn in the middle ground with the mountains off in the distance.

After this piece I drove out to White Face Mountain to paint from the top, but the road was closed and off limits. I tried finding out

where the group had gone too, but couldn’t find them right off but I found a nice little farm that had a couple barns that caught my eye. I jumped out of my car and quickly began painting. The owners dropped by and

"A Thresher in DeBois"

“A Thresher in DeBois”

said some interesting things about the history of the buildings.

Snuck in for dinner 1 hour early and then headed to Lake Placid to paint. Someone was saying that there is an excellent view from up there but I could not find the expansive lookout scene I had in my mind, so I gave up my preconceived ideas and went with what was presenting itself. I was quickly running out of light, so I threw on a canvas and painted the late afternoon light as it was going down on high peaks to the Southeast along Adirondack Loj Road.

The day finished up by sitting up near the bar at Paul Smith with some of the other artists listening to maybe 10 artists who just so happened to bring along musical instruments to help wile away the hours. All good fun.

"Pronounced Loj"

“Pronounced Loj”

Sunshine Daydream: Day 4

June 19, 2014 by admin

If you would like to get “technical” today was the first “full” day at the “Plein Air Camp”. I slept great despite the dorm room that has what has to be a sleep number 110 or something. I am a definite 40. I must have been tired.

Heron Marsh Trail

Heron Marsh Trail

Maybe it’s like this on all campuses now-a-days, but you need to use your electronic key card 4 times to get from the entrance of the dorm building into your bedroom. Don’t forget to take it with you when you use the restroom! Silly me I had tossed it on the bed and then went to the bathroom, only to find I needed to call campus security to get back in. I now keep this card on me around my neck, even when I shower.

After breakfast there was a group photo taken and then all drove the short trip to the “VIC” to paint. This is part of the Paul Smith college I believe, but it’s 1,000’s of acres of woods and wetlands with beautiful vistas, and soft pine hiking trails darting through the park. I opted for a 1 mile hike along the Heron Marsh trail to the “Shingle Falls”. The view I was looking at was not what I had in mind, so I found a little scene close by, so I could still enjoy the sounds of the falls. A rock was nestled in the dark water with lillies and grass marshes about.

It had been raining all night, and with a slight threat to continue, but the sky was mostly gray and the light pretty consistent.

There were mosquitoes and flies about, but I was not bothered by that probably do to my sufficient dousing of the self with bug spray

High Falls Gorge

High Falls Gorge

and then a little clip on “OFF” bug repellent that works great! Folks have been warning me of the vicious “black fly” and I have fortunately not come into contact with it, or them.

I was very happy with this painting, and will post sometime. I believe I called it “It does make a Sound”.

After lunch was an hour trip to “High Falls Gorge” it’s about a waterfall with a 700′ drop. This is about 3 miles from the Canadian border. It was quite the hike down the 250+ stairs. It was worth the trip, though it was hard to see with all the artists there painting. It was a good thing it was 700 feet tall! This painting I did here was “Down in Front”.

Drove back just in time for dinner (Mom & Dad would call it supper) and afterwards I had time to join a few people on the edge of the lake and painted the late afternoon across the lake.

Cool thing about all this is seeing all of the other artists and how they approach their subject, and then there “plein air setup”. Everyone’s is somewhat unique to themselves, or so it seemed.

All the paintings for the day by all the artists are gathered together in a room for everyone to see. There is no hierarchy to this event, all artists are created… I mean, treated equal. But some of the more famous ones do have their names “dropped” more often than others.

I blew out a heel in one of my hiking boots today, something that is going to take a cobbler to fix… is there a cobbler in the house? I bet so.

Up with the Joneses

Up with the Joneses

Sunshine Day Dream: Day 3

June 18, 2014 by admin
Tupper Lake

Tupper Lake

How many times have you taken a trip arriving after dark, and the next day when the sun comes up the world that lays before you is nothing like what was there when the lights were out?

The Publisher’s Invitational is tucked away at the lovely Paul Smith College in the Adirondacks of New York, with it’s campus taking up much of the Lower St Regis Lake. A beautiful setting that I neglected to actually photograph today. I will make sure I take some shots around the area, even better, I will paint a few pictures and maybe you can get a better sense of its charm.

Cruising the windy roads took much of the day, along with check-in and orientation… and then trying to say hello to the 199 artists gathered here from all corners of America. What a great idea, 100 artists of all levels just here to paint. No workshops, no competitions, no pressure. Just relax and take in the land as only the plein air artist can.

I painted in two locations today, one was along a railroad bridge over a waterway connecting Lake Clear with something on the other

Lake Clear

Lake Clear

side… I had no idea and unlike the fisherman who put in right beside me. I think he knew this area like the back of his hand. He spent almost an hour there getting his kayak and all it’s gear ready for a the day on the lakes.

After checking I headed just around the corner to “The Vic” short for Paul Smiths “Visitor Interpretive Road Trip Day 3 028Center” which is a large area of woods, and wetlands with boardwalks and trails through the countryside. After spending much of the day in the bright sunshine, I took advantage of the shade of the Adirondack forest and painted from within. On Wednesday I believe all the artists are expected to come and paint on the grounds.

I had been told/warned ahead of time, but without actually experiencing it one cannot actually believe it… and taht is the flying insects. Incredible!

The VIC

The VIC

back to top